Tag Archives: javacaps6

GlassFish ESB v2.2 – Processing Explicit HL7 v2 Accept Acknowledgements

The HL7 v2 standard mandates the use of acknowledgments to ensure message delivery, critical in Healthcare. There are the “Original Mode” acknowledgments and “Enhanced Mode” acknowledgements. Within the enhanced mode acknowledgments there are “Accept Acknowledgements” and “Application Acknowledgements”.

This Note walks through development of two BPEL Module-based solutions that cooperate in generating and processing Enhanced Accept Acknowledgments using HL7 v2.3.1 messages. This discussion should apply to any v2.x, greater then v2.2, where the Enhanced Mode acknowledgments were introduced. In addition, the solutions are used to illustrate receiving HL7 BC ACK generation, when receiving an invalid HL7 message.

The Note, Processing_Explicit_HL7_AcceptAcks_v1.0.0.0.pdf, can be found at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/Processing_Explicit_HL7_AcceptAcks_v1.0.0.0.pdf.
The associated GlassFish ESB v2.2 Projects, HL7EA_Projects.zip, can be found at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/HL7EA_Projects.zip.

Getting Hundreds of Files using Batch Local File eWay in Java CAPS 6

Occasionally one needs to pick up and process a large number of files, on the order of hundreds or thousands. With the Batch Inbound eWay/JCA Adapter it is not possible to pick up more then one file per poll. The Batch Local File, if triggered by some event other then an appearance of a file in a directory, perhaps a Scheduler trigger or a manual trigger, with correctly designed logic, can process many files in a single invocation.

The document, ProcessingHundredsOfFileWithBatchAdapter.pdf, discusses how Batch Local File-based solution can be constructed to effectively process hundreds of files in a single pass.

This article references a ZIP archive “ProcessingHundredsOfFileWithBatchAdapter.zip“.

Use Subversion with GlassFishESB, OpenESB or Java CAPS 6 for version control

Java CAPS 5.x came with its own, built-in version control system, which many people liked and many despised. Java CAPS 6 Repository still has that version control system. Unlike the repository-based components standard NetBeans components, EJBs, and the JBI-based components, developed through the OpenESB Project and supported, for a fee, in the GlassFishESB product, must use an external version control system, if they are to be placed under version control.

This note discusses how a Subversion VCS can be installed on a Windows platform and used to provide version control for non-Repository components in Java CAPS 6 product and for projects in the GlassFishESB product and OpenESB project.

Clearly, non-Windows platforms can be similarly configured to support Subversion.

This Note, Subversion_with_OpenESB_GlassFishESB_or_JavaCAPS6, is a step-by-step guide to getting Subversion installed and configured to work with NetBeans 6.1. It is not a tutorial on version control.

Java CAPS Quick Note 002 – JCA Transform HL7 Delimited to Custom XML

This Quick Note discusses a solution to the use case provided by Marcus Davies.

I am trying to read HL7 from JMS (preferably stcms) and populate an outbound XML data structure (different to the XML generated by the decoder).
I have been thinking of doing one of the following […]:
1.    Use a Concrete JMS WS using the HL7 encoders to unmarshal the HL7 and use JAXB to populate the outbound XML.  Unfortunately this does not appear to connect to the stcms queue as I can not see any receivers
2.    Use a JCA MDB to read from the stcms JMS queue – this works but I don’t think I can use the HL7 encoder like this
3.    Use and MDB to read from JMS, manually unmarshal the HL7 and use JAXB to populate the data structure
Ideally I would like to use the HL7 encoders.  Do you think the first approach should work?

Number 1 will not work as at end of February 2009 because the JMS BC does not properly decode the HL7 delimited message. This is a know issue. I don’t know what the status of this is. The only BCs that know how to deal with HL7 delimited, that I know of, are the File BC and the HL7 BC.

Number 2 should work. I did not personally try it. You can invoke an encoder library from Java. Have a look at http://wiki.open-esb.java.net/Wiki.jsp?page=UseEncodersInJavaSE.

Number 3 should work but it will be very laborious.

I have a Number 4, which uses a HL7 OTD and a custom XSD-based OTD in a JCA EJB. You may or may not like it but it’s the best thing to do if you can not use BPEL 2.0 to do the mapping and you don’t want to build a repository-based solution (which would be the best for your case anyway).

The solution involves the use of:
1.    HL7 2.3.1 OTD Library (Java CAPS 6 Repository)
2.    JMS JCA to trigger a MDB with a HL7 Delimited message
3.    JMS JCA to write result message out
4.    JCA MDB to do the processing
5.    OTDImporter to provide HL7 2.3.1 OTD and custom XSD-based OTD to the EJB for “convenient” mapping

Brief steps to implement this solution are given in Quick Note 002 at QuickNote002_For_Marcus_Davies.pdf. Archive containing project exports and sample data is provided at QuickNote002.zip. The code will work in Java CAPS 6 Update 1.

Java CAPS Quick Note 001 – Split file into multiple files

This Quick Note discusses a solution to the use case provided by Richard Kuiter.

An input file contains the following records:

H100000000000014099120ASN00507
L1140991200000008261850826185738
L1140991200000008261850826185738
L1140991200000008261850826185738
L1140991200000008261850826185738
L1140991200000008261850826185738
L1140991200000008261850826185738
H100000000000014099126ASN00531
L1140991260000008262690826269662
L1140991260000008262690826269662
L1140991260000008262690826269662
L1140991260000008262690826269662
L1140991260000008262690826269662

It is required that each block of records starting with the H1 (header) record and containing all the following L1 (line) records, be written to a different file.

The solution involves the use of:
1.    Batch Inbound eWay to locate the input file and provide its name and location to a Java Collaboration Definition
2.    Batch Local File eWay to provide an Input Stream to the Batch Record eWay
3.    Batch Record eWay to break up the input stream into records delimited by carriage return+new line
4.    Batch Local File eWay to write each block of records to a file with a distinct name

Brief steps to implement this solution are given in the full Quick Note as QuickNote_001. The collaboration code will work in Java CAPS 5 and 6 Repository.

Java CAPS 6 Update 1 – Invoking MTOM Web Service using Java CAPS Classic Web Service Client

If we overlook the fact that using web services to transfer large payloads is a very stupid idea, we will be faced with the need to implement the optimisation mechanisms to make transfer of large payloads using web services a little less inefficient from the stand point of the size of the over-the-wire data to be transferred. The standardised, supported mechanism for this is the Message Transmission Optimisation Method (MTOM), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MTOM. Java CAPS Repository-based Web Services don’t offer a convenient mechanism to provide MTOM support.

This note walks through the implementation of a Java CAPS Repository-based, eInsight-based web service consumer and the implementation of the EJB-based Web Service Wrapper Consumer for this service, which provides support for MTOM. The Note discusses how to exercise the wrapper service using the NetBeans web services testing facilities, how to trigger the Java CAPS Repository-based web service invoker and how to observe on-the-wire message exchanges. The invoker implementations discussed in this Note will invoke the web service providers discussed in an earlier Note, “Java CAPS – Exposing MTOM-capable Java CAPS Classic Web Service”, http://blogs.sun.com/javacapsfieldtech/entry/java_caps_exposing_mtom_capable.

The note is available as Invoking_MTOM-WS_using_Java_CAPS_Classic.pdf

Java CAPS – Exposing MTOM-capable Java CAPS Classic Web Service

If we overlook the fact that using web services to transfer large payloads is a very stupid idea, we will be faced with the need to implement the optimisation mechanisms to make transfer of large payloads using web services a little less inefficient from the stand point of the size of the over-the-wire data to be transferred.

The standardised, supported mechanism for this is the Message Transmission Optimisation Method (MTOM), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MTOM. Java CAPS Repository-based Web Services don’t offer a convenient mechanism to provide MTOM support.

This note walks through the implementation of a Java CAPS Repository-based, eInsight-based web service and the implementation of the EJB-based Web Service Wrapper for this service, which provides support for MTOM. The Note discusses how to exercise the services using the NetBeans web services testing facilities and how to observe on-the-wire message exchanges.

The note is available as Exposing_MTOM-capable_Java_CAPS_Classic_Web_Service.pdf

HL7 Processor Example – Development Screencast

The Note “HL7 Processor Demonstration – Java CAPS 6/JBI and OpenESB” walks the reader through development of a Java CAPS 6/JBI-based / OpenESB-based solution that addresses a Healthcare-related business problem. The Note elaborates on the healthcare background necessary to get a notion of what is being done and why, and provides detailed steps required to implement and exercise the solution.

I recorded a screencast of a session during which I discuss the business side of the Note, then discuss, implement, deploy and exercise all components of the solution documented in the Note.

The screencast is here: HL7Processor_Exercise_Screencast.avi. The associated archive, 00_HL7Processor_example_screencast_companion.zip, contains code fragments and other bits and pieces which are used, or referred to, in the screencast. Of some interest are the Note itself, in documents/00_HL7_Example_Development_Instructions_Final.pdf, and the brief example implementation instructions, in documents/00_HL7_ExampleBrief.pdf. I followed the brief instructions while I was building the projects when recording the screencast.

The screencast, which is over 320 Mb in size and takes 2 hours and 50 minutes to play, may require a TechSmith Compression Codec on your machine to allow your player to play the media. You can get one from the TechSmith site: http://www.techsmith.com/download/codecs.asp. Information on the codec can also be found here: http://www.movavi.com/codec/TSCC.html. If you prefer, and you are on Windows, you can get the CamPlay.exe from here: CamPlay.zip and use it instead.

HL7 Processor Demonstration – Java CAPS 6/JBI and OpenESB

This Note walks the reader through development of a Java CAPS 6/JBI-based / OpenESB-based solution that addresses a Healthcare-related business problem. The Note elaborates on the healthcare background necessary to get a notion of what is being done and why, and provides detailed steps required to implement and exercise the solution to the business problem.

Updated note, where GlassFsish ESB v2.1 is used instead of Java CAPS 6, is available at 00_HL7_Example_Development_Instructions_Final_1.1.2.pdf

We will use the HL7 Binding Component, the File Binding Component, the JMS Binding Component, the SOAP/HTTP Binding Component, the BPEL 2.0 Service Engine, the JavaEE Service Engine, the HL7 Encoder and EJB-based Web Services in a JBI-based solution.

In the process we will create XML Schema Documents (XSDs), Web Services Description Language Documents (WSDLs), a BPEL 2.0 Business Process, an EJB-based “Implementation First” web service, an EJB- and WSDL-based “Interface First” web service, a bunch of Composite Applications, BPLE 2.0 mapping, BPEL 2.0-based Web Service orchestration, on-the-fly conversion of HL7 version 2.3.1 delimited messages to their XML equivalents. We will get a pretty good exposure to what OpenESB and Java CAPS 6/JBI components look like, how they work and how they can be used to create real business solutions. Above all, we will develop and test a solution that is more sophisticated then the customary “Hello World” examples but not so complex as to take too long to build and become too hard to comprehend by a novice user.

The particular business problem and the particular solution came about because once upon a time there was intent to build a series of related OpenESB projects – HL7 Processor, MDM Processor and IEP Processor – that would:

  • receive HL7 v2.x delimited messages
  • convert HL7 v2.x messages to their equivalent XML format
  • split message stream into ADT A01s, ADT A03s and other
  • convert A01s to an abbreviated Custom Patient XML format
  • convert A03s to an abbreviated Custom Discharge format
  • send Custom Patients to a JMS Queue for processing by a MDM solution
  • send Custom Discharges to a JMS Queue for processing by an IEM solution
  • have the MDM process Custom Patients into a Master Patient Index
  • have the IEP process Custom Discharges to flag excessive length of stay

The MDM Processor and the IEP Processor made it to the Sun CEC 2008 as demonstrations, with associated Tutorials by Tom Barrett, and demonstration recordings by me. The HL7 Processor did not make it. With the appearance of Java CAPS 6 Update 1 more JBI components made it into the officially supported Sun product. While the HL7 BC and the HL7 Encoder did not make it into this Update they will, eventually. Both components are already available from the OpenESB site and can be installed into the Java CAPS 6 Update 1 installation as unsupported components. This is what we will do for this Note.

The complete Note is to be found here.

The archive containing supplementary material you can use to save yourself the trouble of downloading component and, above all else, containing test files with HL7 delimited records, is here.

For these interested in processing HL7 using GlassFish ESB v2.1 there is a blog entry, “GlassFish ESB v2.1, MySQL v5.1 – Make HL7 v2.3.1 Delimited Messages from Custom Delimited Records with HL7 Encoder“, which discusses, amongst other things, how to create a custom HL7 v2 ADT A04 XSD and a “match any” XSD.

GlassFish ESB, Java CAPS 6 and OpenESB Illustrated Solution Development Screencasts

Following the CEC 2008 Conference in Las Vegas, where the Java CAPS Stream saw a bunch of presentations and demonstrations, I am happy to offer screencasts of the three demonstration sessions I recorded for the event.

The GlassFish ESB screencast is the ScreenCast of the CEC 2008 GlassFish ESB Essentials Lab demonstration. This is a recording of the demonstration described in detail by Tom Barrett in
the GlassFish ESB Tutorial and Lab document. The screencast is an extended version of what the CEC audience got to see. In this screencast I use the OpenESB distribution to discuss, design and implement an abbreviated Supply Chain solution
. I use the File BC, the SOAP/HTTP BC, BPEL 2.0 SE, the Custom Ecoder, the XSD Editor, the WSDL Editor, BPEL correlations, BPEL Pick wit Timer, CASA Editor and a bunch of other OpenESB/GlassFish ESB featiures and facilities. Watching the screencast will give you a pretty good idea what the tooling looks like, how easy it is ti use it, how a theoretical requirement can be turned into a practical design and how that design can be implemented and exercised using the tooling and infrastructure you can get free of charge and use as much as you might desire.

Data for the following two screencasts/demonstrations is produced by the solution discussed in the next blog entry, which ought to precede these two.

The Java CAPS 6/Mural Master data Management screencast is the ScreenCast of the CEC 2008 Java CAPS Essentials Master Data Management (MDM) Lab demonstration. This is a recording of the demonstration described in detail by Tom Barrett in the Java CAPS Essentials MDM Tutorial and Lab document. In the screencast I discuss what the Master Data Management (MDM) is, how a Healthcare enterprise might leverage it to improve its business and how the OpenESB or Java CAPS 6 can be used to implement MDM. I use OpenESB to design a Master Patient Index Data Model, implement it with the tool, generate Data Model-based Master Index Data Management Web Application, build an integration solution to feed the MDM solution with transactional data form Hospital Information Systems and build a broadcast processor solution that can be used to send master patient index updates to downstream systems which have a need to be kept in synch with the enterprise view of the patient. One will get a very good idea of what the core Master Data Management is about, how easy it is to create the MDM Application and related integration components using the OpenESB/Java CAPS 6 tooling, and how the business of maintaining master patient index looks and works like.

The Java CAPS 6 / Intelligent Event Processor screencast is the ScreenCast of the CEC 2008 Java
CAPS Essentials IEP Lab demonstration. This is a recording of the demonstration described in detail by Tom Barrett in the Java CAPS Essentials IEP Tutorial and Lab document.The screencast is what the CEC audience got to see. In this screencast I demonstrate how an Intelligent Event Processing (IEP) solution is built and exercised. The solution addresses a Helathcare business problem – it calculates an Average Length of Stay for each patient in a sliding time window, based on data from an ADT A03 HL7 Discharge message, works out which patients’ Length of Stay exceeds average for the patients in the window by 1.5 times, and passes records related to these patients
on while discarding ‘normal’ records.

The AVIs were recorded with Camtasia Studio. You may need a Camtasia Player to playe them on Windows. You could also try getting a Camtasia codec for your platform/player from the Camtasia site.

I had audio quality problems when directly playing the recordings through Mozilla, which used the Quicktime plugin. The best thing to do is to download the recordings and try different players until one works for you.;

Enjoy.