Jun 23

This article is a follow on to the “Oracle SOA Suite 11g HL7 Inbound Example”, at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/2010/06/oracle-soa-suite-11g-hl7-inbound-example. In that article the B2B infrastructure was configured to return the “immediate ack” as soon as it received each message. The ACK was always a positive ACK, regardless of whether the message was valid or not and whether it was successfully processed.

In this article I expand on the previous post by adding the Functional ACK, an explicit ACK message, which is returned after a message is parsed and validated, if validation is required. This means that rather than always returning an ACK the receiver will return a NAK if the message is invalid.

The article, 02_Oracle_SOA_Suite_HL7_inbound_example_ACK_Addendum_v0.2.3.pdf, is available at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/02_Oracle_SOA_Suite_HL7_inbound_example_ACK_Addendum_v0.2.3.pdf

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Jun 19

As Sun Microsystems, and SeeBeyond before it, Oracle provides support for integration of systems which use HL7 v2.x messaging. Unlike Sun, and SeeBeyond before it, Oracle treats HL7 messaging as Business to Business exchanges (B2B) and uses the B2B part of the Oracle SOA Suite to accomplish the task [1].

In this article I develop and exercise a simple Oracle SOA Suite 11g B2B infrastructure-based HL7 v2 Receiver project for an ADT A01 message and use Message tracker to view messages, message states and messaging performance.

The complete article, 02_Oracle_SOA_Suite_HL7_inbound_example_v0.2.1.pdf, can be found at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/02_Oracle_SOA_Suite_HL7_inbound_example_v0.2.1.pdf

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Jun 19

As Sun Microsystems, and SeeBeyond before it, Oracle provides support for integration of systems which use HL7 v2.x messaging. Unlike Sun, and SeeBeyond before it, Oracle treats HL7 messaging as Business to Business exchanges (B2B) and uses the B2B part of the Oracle SOA Suite to accomplish the task [1].

There are numerous articles on Oracle SOA Suite and on Oracle B2B. To wade through this material to get to a concise set of steps needed to get started with HL7 messaging is a chore precisely because there is so much material about the SOA Suite and so little on how to deal with HL7 suing it. I set off to work out what it takes to do HL7 messaging and to document it for myself and others.

This article walks through the installation and configuration of all Oracle software necessary to implement HL7 v2.x messaging as development / experimentation environment. It assumes a single machine with limited resources.

I expect that there will be subsequent articles in this series which will use this infrastructure to implement specific HL7 v2.x examples.

The complete article, 01_Installing_Oracle_SOA_Suite_for_HL7_exploration_v1.1.pdf, can be found at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/01_Installing_Oracle_SOA_Suite_for_HL7_exploration_v1.1.pdf.

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Apr 25

From time to time prospective clients ask for a proof that Java CAPS will not loose HL7 messages in the event of machine or network failure.

In this Note a heterogeneous, non-clustered collection of hosts will be used to implement and exercise Java CAPS 6/Repository HL7 v2 based solutions. The environment consists of two independent “machines”, which are not a part of an Operating System Cluster. Each “machine” hosts a GlassFish Application Server, which is the Java CAPS 6 runtime. Application Servers are independent of one another and are not clustered. This is to demonstrate that HL7 processing components, and solutions based on these components and other standard components in the Java CAPS infrastructure, can be designed and implemented in such a way that message loss in the event of typical failure and disruption scenarios is avoided.

This note discusses an exercise involving an example healthcare environment processing HL7 v2 messages. Discussion includes customization of a generic Java CAPS 6.2 VMware Virtual Appliance for a specific HL7 exercise and deploying ready-made Java CAPS 6/Repository-based solutions. The exercise for HL7 eWay and HL7 Inbound and Outbound projects, processing HL7 v2.3.1 messages, will be conducted and discussed.

The reader will be convinced that a resilient Java CAPS solution can be configured and that it will process messages in the face of typical failure and disruption scenarios without message loss or duplication.

Note that this article is not introductory in nature. It assumes that the reader has a fairly good working knowledge of the Java CAPS 5 or Java CAPS 6/Repository product and a good working knowledge of related areas, such as HL7 messaging, virtualisation and suchlike. These matters are not explained in this article.

The note is available as 03_Conducting_JavaCAPS_6_HL7_Resilience_Exercise_v1.0.0.0.pdf at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/03_Conducting_JavaCAPS_6_HL7_Resilience_Exercise_v1.0.0.0.pdf

Kiran Busi pointed out o me that the project export links in the PDF documehnt are broken. Here they are, correct this time. It is less trouble to post them here then to modify the PDF and re-post that.

JC62_HL7_Resilience_Project_Exports_no_Envs – http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/JC62_HL7_Resilience_Project_Exports_no_Envs.zip

JC62_HL7_Resilience_Project_Exports_with_Envs – http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/JC62_HL7_Resilience_Project_Exports_with_Envs.zip

Apr 24

From time to time prospective clients ask for a proof that Java CAPS will not loose HL7 messages in the event of machine or network failure.

This note walks through the process of installing a Java CAPS 6.2 runtime on the Base OpenSolaris-based VMware Virtual Appliance, discussed in the Blog Entry “GlassFish ESB v2.x Field Notes – Preparing Basic JeOS Appliance for GlassFish ESB LB and HA Testing” at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/2010/01/glassfish-esb-v2-x-field-notes-preparing-basic-jeos-appliance-for-glassfish-esb-lb-and-ha-testing.

At the end of the Note we will have a Java CAPS 6.2 VMware Appliance with Java CAPS 6.2 Runtime infrastructure, ready to use for reliability testing, or any other purpose for which a Java CAPS 6.2 runtime appliance might be appropriate.

The Note is available at “http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/02_Installing_JavaCAPS_6.2_on_JeOS_appliance_v1.0.0.0.pdf“.

Mar 06

 

I am sorry to say that as at September 2010 all these links are no longer valid – seems like somebody has been going around closing sites to make sure that HL7 standards do not get used too widely 🙁

For these who have a need, the HL7 v 2.3.1 standard document is available online at http://www.medclinic.net/HL7Specs/ as at February 24, 2010. The site does not seems to have been updated for a long time so the standard document may well be available for a while longer.

HL7 v 2.3 document is available at http://www.uhc.com.pl/teksty/HL7/, again, as at February 24, 2010.

IHE Europe has an interesting “interactive” site where HL7 can be “explored” at http://ihe.univ-rennes1.fr/HL7/.

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Jan 26

In the blog entry “GlassFish ESB v2.2 Field Notes – Exercising Load Balanced, Highly Available, Horizontally Scalable HL7 v2 Processing Solutions”, at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/?p=13, I present the GlassFish ESB v2.2-based load balanced, highly available, horizontally scalable solution for HL7 v2.x delimited messaging, using both the HL7 Binding Components, Web Services and JMS in request/reply mode. The one and a half hour recording of me discussing and demonstrating this solution is available as a Flash Movie (SWF), “GFESB_LB_HA_Demo_Session SWF ” at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/GFESB_LB_HA_Demo_Session_SWF.swf (62.7Mb download)

Jan 12

The HL7 v2 standard mandates the use of acknowledgments to ensure message delivery, critical in Healthcare. There are the “Original Mode” acknowledgments and “Enhanced Mode” acknowledgements. Within the enhanced mode acknowledgments there are “Accept Acknowledgements” and “Application Acknowledgements”.

This Note walks through development of two BPEL Module-based solutions that cooperate in generating and processing Enhanced Accept Acknowledgments using HL7 v2.3.1 messages. This discussion should apply to any v2.x, greater then v2.2, where the Enhanced Mode acknowledgments were introduced. In addition, the solutions are used to illustrate receiving HL7 BC ACK generation, when receiving an invalid HL7 message.

The Note, Processing_Explicit_HL7_AcceptAcks_v1.0.0.0.pdf, can be found at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/Processing_Explicit_HL7_AcceptAcks_v1.0.0.0.pdf.
The associated GlassFish ESB v2.2 Projects, HL7EA_Projects.zip, can be found at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/HL7EA_Projects.zip.

Jan 09

GlassFish ESB v2.2 was released in late December/early January 2010. This release brings a number of design-time improvements in handling HL7 v2 messages. Some of these have been on my and other people’s wish lists for years.

HL7 v2 structure nodes use full names, rather then acronyms like MSH.1.
In BPEL, mapping can be performed at message, segment, component, subcomponent and field level.

These improvements are noteworthy enough to warrant a note, GFESBv22_HL7_Handling_Improvements.pdf, at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/GFESBv22_HL7_Handling_Improvements.pdf.

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Jan 08

When working on the HA solutions discussed in my HA blog entry I realized that it will be difficult to work out whether messages are delivered in order, as was required, and whether any are missing. I got over the issue by ensuring that my test data was prepared in such a way that messages in each test file had increasing, contiguous sequence numbers embedded in the message. For HL7 v2, which is the messaging standard with which I dealt, I used MSH-10, Message Control ID field. I wrote processed messages and acknowledgments to files whose names embedded MSH-10 Message Control Id, with the sequence number, so breaks in sequence and out of order messages could be readily detected.

With multiple message files containing between 1 and 50,000 messages, adding a sequence number to each message by hand was clearly out of the question.

I put the GlassFish ESB to use. I constructed a file-to-file BPEL module project to read each test file and to prepend a sequence number to each message’s MSH-10 field. The only snag was how to get a sequence number that would start at 0 and increase by 1 for each message, such that each BPEL process instance would get the next sequence, and that messages would be written to the output file in order.

This note discusses how I went about accomplishing the task.

The complete note, GFESBv22_EphemeralSequenceGenerator_v1.0.0.0.pdf, is to be found at: http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/GFESBv22_EphemeralSequenceGenerator_v1.0.0.0.pdf

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