Tag Archives: bpel

GlassFish ESB, Java CAPS 6 and OpenESB Illustrated Solution Development Screencasts

Following the CEC 2008 Conference in Las Vegas, where the Java CAPS Stream saw a bunch of presentations and demonstrations, I am happy to offer screencasts of the three demonstration sessions I recorded for the event.

The GlassFish ESB screencast is the ScreenCast of the CEC 2008 GlassFish ESB Essentials Lab demonstration. This is a recording of the demonstration described in detail by Tom Barrett in
the GlassFish ESB Tutorial and Lab document. The screencast is an extended version of what the CEC audience got to see. In this screencast I use the OpenESB distribution to discuss, design and implement an abbreviated Supply Chain solution
. I use the File BC, the SOAP/HTTP BC, BPEL 2.0 SE, the Custom Ecoder, the XSD Editor, the WSDL Editor, BPEL correlations, BPEL Pick wit Timer, CASA Editor and a bunch of other OpenESB/GlassFish ESB featiures and facilities. Watching the screencast will give you a pretty good idea what the tooling looks like, how easy it is ti use it, how a theoretical requirement can be turned into a practical design and how that design can be implemented and exercised using the tooling and infrastructure you can get free of charge and use as much as you might desire.

Data for the following two screencasts/demonstrations is produced by the solution discussed in the next blog entry, which ought to precede these two.

The Java CAPS 6/Mural Master data Management screencast is the ScreenCast of the CEC 2008 Java CAPS Essentials Master Data Management (MDM) Lab demonstration. This is a recording of the demonstration described in detail by Tom Barrett in the Java CAPS Essentials MDM Tutorial and Lab document. In the screencast I discuss what the Master Data Management (MDM) is, how a Healthcare enterprise might leverage it to improve its business and how the OpenESB or Java CAPS 6 can be used to implement MDM. I use OpenESB to design a Master Patient Index Data Model, implement it with the tool, generate Data Model-based Master Index Data Management Web Application, build an integration solution to feed the MDM solution with transactional data form Hospital Information Systems and build a broadcast processor solution that can be used to send master patient index updates to downstream systems which have a need to be kept in synch with the enterprise view of the patient. One will get a very good idea of what the core Master Data Management is about, how easy it is to create the MDM Application and related integration components using the OpenESB/Java CAPS 6 tooling, and how the business of maintaining master patient index looks and works like.

The Java CAPS 6 / Intelligent Event Processor screencast is the ScreenCast of the CEC 2008 Java
CAPS Essentials IEP Lab demonstration. This is a recording of the demonstration described in detail by Tom Barrett in the Java CAPS Essentials IEP Tutorial and Lab document.The screencast is what the CEC audience got to see. In this screencast I demonstrate how an Intelligent Event Processing (IEP) solution is built and exercised. The solution addresses a Helathcare business problem – it calculates an Average Length of Stay for each patient in a sliding time window, based on data from an ADT A03 HL7 Discharge message, works out which patients’ Length of Stay exceeds average for the patients in the window by 1.5 times, and passes records related to these patients
on while discarding ‘normal’ records.

The AVIs were recorded with Camtasia Studio. You may need a Camtasia Player to playe them on Windows. You could also try getting a Camtasia codec for your platform/player from the Camtasia site.

I had audio quality problems when directly playing the recordings through Mozilla, which used the Quicktime plugin. The best thing to do is to download the recordings and try different players until one works for you.;

Enjoy.

Java CAPS 6, Using JCA and JBI, Note 3, Batch Inbound, through Batch Local File to BPEL 2.0

Java CAPS 6 has the 5.x compatibility infrastructure which allows one to import 5.x projects right into Java CAPS 6, build, deploy and run without changes. One can also develop repository-based projects in Java CAPS 6 – that’s the 5.x-style projects. This is the old way of developing Java CAPS solutions – still good and valid.

If one were to decide to not use the old way there is the JBI infrastructure, which allows development of solutions that use BPEL Service Engine, XSLT Service Engine, IEP Service Engine, Java EE Service Engine, etc., and a variety of Binding Components. The implication is that business logic is implemented in BPEL 2.0, which is used to orchestrate other services and resources, including interaction with external systems through Binding Components. This is the new way of developing Java CAPS solutions – 100% compatible with the Open Source OpenESB project since it uses the OpenESB project-developed container and components.

Someone might ask “so what happened to eGate?”. “eGate” meaning Java Collaboration Definition-like logic components, eWays and the JMS messaging backbone.

While the facility seems underadvertised/downplayed, Java CAPS 6 provides a number of 5.1 eWay-based JCA Adapters and a moderately easy means of developing JCA Message-Driven Beans that can use these adapters to implement JCD-like logic components and, effectively, eGate-like solutions that do not use BPEL or the JBI infrastructure.

This Note discusses and illustrates the implementation of a mixed Java CAPS 5.x-like integration solution that retrieves a file from the local file system using JCA Adapters and passes its content to a BPEL 2.0 process executing in the JBI container. This requirement I have seen and heard of being implemented in 5.x many times by many customers.

Most of the material in the first 16 pages of this Note is the same as in Note 2.

The JCA Message-Driven Bean, the piece of JCD-like Java logic, will be triggered by a Batch Inbound Adapter (what one would have called the Batch Inbound eWay in 5.1), will read the content of the file using the Batch Local File Adapter (eWay) and will send the payload as a string to a BPEL 2.0 Business Process, which will be triggered by this message and will execute in the JBI container. The batch Inbound Adapter will be configured to use a regular expression to match the name of the file. Once it finds the file it will rename the file by prepending the GUID to the name and will pass the new name, the original name and the directory path to the Java code. This is exactly what the 5.1 Batch Inbound does. The JCA MDB will use the new name, the original name and the directory path to dynamically configure the Batch Local File Adapter to retrieve the file content and rename the file (post transfer) to the original name with some string appended to indicate that the file was processed. This, too, is exactly what one would do in a 5.1 JCD in the same circumstance. Once the payload is available the JCA MDB will use the OneWay WSDL interface and the JBI NMR to send it, as a String, to a BPEL 2.0 process. Both the JCA MDB and the BPEL process will be a part of the same JBI Composite Application and will communicate with one another using the Normalized Message Router (NMR).

The entire Note is available in 03JCA-BInboundThroughBLFToBPEL2.0.pdf

Java CAPS 6/JBI Note 1 – Basic File-BPEL-File Project

As implemented in OpenESB and Java CAPS 6/JBI, JBI at first put me off completely. I had no idea where to start and what to do. This was particularly annoying as I was reasonably effective in developing solutions using Java CAPS 5.x and did not look forward to trying to figure out how to do in OpenESB the same thing I already new how to do.

This document is intended to save you the anxiety and help you get over the initial hurdles. It walks through the process of creation, deployment and execution of a simple File-to-File integration solution, with detailed step-by-step illustrations. The focus is the practice of using JBI components not the theory of JBI.

This document addresses the integration solution developers, not developers of Service Engines or Binding Components.

The projects use JBI components only, that’s why they are just as good for OpenESB exploration as they are for Java CAPS 6/JBI exploration.

JBI (Java Business Integration) is not discussed to any great extent. JBI artifact names are used in discussion but not elaborated upon. Explanations are provided where necessary to foster understanding of the mechanics of developing integration solutions using JBI technologies in OpenESB and Java CAPS 6/JBI.

Java CAPS 6 and OpenESB are two of a number of toolkits that implement the JBI specification (JSR 208). When I use an expression like “In JBI …” I actually mean “In JBI as implemented in Java CAPS 6 and OpenESB …”. The same things may well be implemented differently in other JBI toolkits.

Java CAPS 6 “Revenue Release” is used and shown in illustrations. OpenESB can be used instead however the appearance of components shown in illustrations may vary somewhat.

01File2File.zip contains the document that documents the example in an illustrated, step-by-step fashion.