Aug 26

To develop HL7 v2 messaging solutions which use the SOA Suite for healthcare integration one needs a working development and deployment environment.

This article provides references to components which must be obtained and installed to get a working environment in preparation for development of solutions presented in possible future articles.

This article and the remaining articles assume a development environment based in Microsoft Windows XP 64-bit. Nothing, except the instructions for downloading Windows-specific components and screenshots of Windows-specific non-SOA Suite tools, prevents you from developing on any of the other supported platforms. Convers my Windows-specific instructions to your platform-specific instructions as needed.

The full text of this article is available as “SOA Suite for healthcare integration Series – Overview of the Development Environment” at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/SOASuiteHCI_ch2_Dev_Environ_v0.1.0.pdf.

 

Aug 25

In my past articles I presented, amongst other things, HL7 v2 messaging solutions using the Oracle SOA Suite 11g R1 B2B HL7 infrastructure. At the beginning of the calendar year 2012 Oracle released a new incarnation if its HL7 messaging capability under the name of the “SOA Suite for healthcare integration”. This capability builds on the SOA Suite B2B HL7, adding design, configurator, monitoring and management user interface capabilities which greatly simplify the task of creating HL7 v2 messaging solutions and enhance management and operational reporting.
The new and changed functionality is significant enough for me to consider writing a series of articles on the topic. The series is intended to walk the reader through the tasks of creating specific HL7 v2 messaging solutions using the SOA Suite for healthcare integration.
At this point in time I expect to produce articles on the following topics, in the order given:

  1. Overview of the Development Environment – this article
  2. A Very Brief Overview of HL7 v2 Messaging
  3. A Very Brief Overview of the SOA Suite for healthcare integration
  4. Creating a Canonical Message Model – http://blogs.czapski.id.au/2012/09/soa-suite-for-healthcare-integration-series-creating-a-canonical-hl7-v2-message-model
  5. HL7 v2 Inbound to File – http://blogs.czapski.id.au/2012/11/soa-suite-for-healthcare-integration-series-hl7-v2-inbound-to-file-solution
  6. Constructing file name from message content and messaging properties – http://blogs.czapski.id.au/2012/11/soa-suite-for-healthcare-integration-series-hl7-v2-inbound-to-file-solution
  7. HL7 v2 Inbound to HL7 v2 Outbound Pass-through – http://blogs.czapski.id.au/2012/12/soa-suite-for-healthcare-integration-series-hl7-v2-inbound-cmm-to-outbound-pass-through-solution
  8. Transformation and Routing using XSL and Mediator – http://blogs.czapski.id.au/2012/12/soa-suite-for-healthcare-integration-series-routing-and-transformation-using-xsl-solution
  9. Adding Data Map for pass-through code translation – http://blogs.czapski.id.au/2013/01/soa-suite-for-healthcare-integration-series-domain-value-map-dvm-on-the-fly-code-mapping
  10. Automating Exception Message Handling – http://blogs.czapski.id.au/2013/01/soa-suite-for-healthcare-integration-series-exception-handling-processing-endpoint-errors
  11. Externalise, “Repair” and Resubmit “broken” messages – http://blogs.czapski.id.au/2013/01/soa-suite-for-healthcare-integration-series-externalise-repair-and-resubmit-broken-messages
  12. Implementing an A19 Query Processor – http://blogs.czapski.id.au/2013/01/soa-suite-for-healthcare-integration-series-implement-an-a19-query-processor
  13. Send, Receive and Translate HL7 messages using B2B Web Services
  14. Other Key Features
  15. HL7 v2 solution using JMS “the Java CAPS way” – http://blogs.czapski.id.au/2013/02/soa-suite-for-healthcare-integration-series-hl7-v2-solution-using-jms-the-java-caps-way (this article was propmpted by correspondence with Steve L)

It will take some time to produce these articles and the list may change.
I am interested in hearing from people about other topics they might like to see covered. I will consider suggestions though I am not promising that I will act upon them.
In the following sections I am briefly elaborating on what I expect each topic to cover, and presenting a solution schematic where a solution will be developed.

The article is availabe as “SOA Suite for healthcare integration Series – Series Overview” at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/SOASuiteHCI_ch1_Introduction_v0.1.0.pdf.

Dec 13

Recently I had an occasion to work on an integration project which required the Rhapsody 4.01-based integration solution to receive messages from a JMS Topic hosted by the Sun Java System Message Queue bundled with the Oracle/Sun GlassFish v2.x JMS . Product documentation and Internet searches did not offer assistance in terms of how the Rhapsody JMS Adapter needs to be configured to support this. While there are a number of articles which discuss the topic of configuring JMS Client to interact with GlassFish-hosted SJSMQ JMS Server, none of the solutions described in these articles worked for me. A degree of experimentation and creative adaptation resulted in a working configuration. This article discusses this solution for the benefit of these who will be faced with this problem and for my own benefit if I need to do this again in the future.

In this article I deal with JMS client access to the JMS destinations using the “com.sun.jndi.fscontext.RefFSContextFactory”, to which references can be found on the Internet but which is not documented as well as I would have liked when I had a need to use this method.

Here I use Windows conventions for directory and file paths. For Unix, adjust as required. I assume that you have a GlassFish 2.x installation, perhaps as part of a Sun/Oracle Java CAPS SOA infrastructure or as part of the Oracle Healthcare Master Person Index infrastructure. I also assume that you need to create a Rhapsody integration solution using GlassFish environment-hosted JMS topics and/or queues. This last may or may not be your motivation. Except for the Rhapsody bits, the method should hold for any JMS client, but I have not tried this method in any other client deployment. Perhaps someday I will.

The article is available at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Rhapsody_4.01_and_GlassFish-bundledJMS_v1.0.0.pdf

Dec 11

Recently I had an occasion to work on an integration project which required the Rhapsody 4.01-based integration solution to receive messages from a WebLogic-based JMS Topic. Product documentation and Internet searches did not offer assistance in terms of how the Rhapsody JMS Adapter needs to be configured to support this. While there are a number of articles which discuss the topic of configuring JMS Client to interact with WebLogic JMS Server, none of the solutions described in these articles worked for me. A degree of experimentation and creative adaptation resulted in a working configuration. This article discusses this solution for the benefit of these who will be faced with this problem and for my own benefit if I need to do this again in the future.

The article can be found at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Rhapsody_4.01_and_WebLogicJMS_10.3_v1.0.0.pdf

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May 28

I notice that people used to the eGate/Java CAPS way of doing things, when looking at migrating to the SOA Suite for HL7 messaging, are trying to reproduce the pattern “HL7v2Adapter?JMS Queue”. This is not necessary when using SOA Suite but can be done if one insists. This article walks through the process of implementing this pattern using Oracle SOA Suite 11g R1 PS3.

The process will follow these steps:
1. Obtain and configure the QBrowser tool for JMS browsing
2. Obtain and configure the HL7 Sender tool
3. Create two WebLogic JMS Queues to be used in the solution
4. Create and deploy a HL7 v2 Inbound Trading Partnership Agreement
5. Submit HL7 v2 messages and inspect them in the corresponding JMS Queue
6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 for another inbound stream

The cmplete article, which can be found at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/SOASuite_HL7v2_Inbound_to_JMS.pdf, will demonstrate that Oracle SOA Suite B2B HL7 infrastructure can be configured to receive message streams over multiple inbound MLLP channels and deliver each stream to a distinct JMS destination, much as eGate and Java CAPS solutions used to do.

May 28

WebLogic Server does not include a convenient tool to browse JMS destinations. Freely downloadable QBrowser version 2 tool, with some configuration, can be used to provide easy to use functionality to work with WebLogic JMS destinations. This article discusses how QBrowsers should be configured to work with the JMS destinations managed through the WebLogic Server 11g (10.3), which was the current version at the time this article was written.

The complete article is available at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/QBrowser_for_WebLogicJMS_10.3.pdf

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Apr 08

The Oracle SOA Suite 11g R1 B2B functionality can be used for HL7 v2.x delimited messaging, both inbound and outbound. I have a series of articles which provide step-by-step instructions for developing HL7 v2.x delimited messaging solutions for processing inbound and outbound messages, with varying ACK patterns – http://blogs.czapski.id.au/?s=hl7+soa+suite.

This article discusses how an A19 Query processing solution can be implemented using the SOA Suite 11g R1 PS3.
We have a client sending a HL7 v2.3.1 A19 QRY request, asking for demographic details for a patient specified by an ID. The HL7 v2.3.1 A19 ADR response will carry a PID segment with basic demographics. The client identifies itself with MSH-3 (Application ID) of “A19QRY” and MSH-4 (Facility ID) of “CLI1”. The query processor is identified by the client with MSH-5 (Application ID) of “A19ADR” and MSH-6 (Facility ID) of “GWYQ”.

The complete article is to be found at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/09_SOASuite11gR1PS3_HL7_A19_Processor_v1.0.0.pdf

 

 

Dec 29

New release, v0.7, is available – see link below for downloadable archive. Throughput masurements were added. Manpages were updated.

I spend considerable time working with HL7. In the past I used SeeBeyond ICAN and Sun Java CAPS products, and OpenESB with HL7 Binding Component,  to rapidly create MLLP senders and receivers for the HL7 solutions I was building and testing. I also tried, at various times, 7 Scan, Interface Explorer and more recently HL7 Browser. For the blog articles I am writing on HL7 I need simple tooling that allows me to send HL7 v2 delimited messages from a file to a MLLP listener and receive acknowledgements, receive HL7 messages from a sender and retrun acknowledgements, and recently to combine multiple sender message streams into a single stream, with correct acknowledgement handling. The tooling has to be free for me to distribute with the projects and the articles and to use in my day job as well.

Not finding anything that would fit the bill, and that would work reliably enough, I developed my own tools.

I embellished the basic sender a bit so I could send multiple messages, one after the other, from a file, delay between successive sends, generate MSH-10, replace MSH-3-1, MSH-4-1, MSH-5-1 and MSH-6-1, and increase timeout for acknowledgements.

The tools are all old fashioned command line tools – no graphical user interface.

CMDHL7Listener – man page: http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/CMDHL7Listener.pdf

CMDHL7Sender – man page: http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/CMDHL7Sender.pdf

CMDHL7Proxy – man page: http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/CMDHL7Proxy.pdf

Deprecated Distribution: http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/CMDHL7_v0.5.zip

Current Distribution: http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/CMDHL7_v0.7.zip

Release 0.5 and 0.7 are free to use by anyone for any purpose and will stay that way. There may not be future releases 🙂
I used HAPI 1.0.1 libraries for HL7 processing – http://hl7api.sourceforge.net/

Oct 23

In any but the simplest of HL7 messaging environments there will be multiple sources and multiple destinations of HL7 messages. It is very unlikely that all, or even a majority of these, will use exactly the same HL7 message structures in terms of versions, optional/mandatory segments, extension Z segments, and so on. A sensible approach to dealing with these kinds of issues, and a key component of the HL7 Enterprise Architecture, is the so called Canonical (or Common) Message Model (CMM). The CMM works hand-in-glove with the enterprise architecture in which transformation to/from the CMM is performed at the edges of the integration domain. This article discusses major considerations and works through the mechanics of deriving a Canonical Message Model for a fictitious Healthcare Enterprise and implementing it using the Oracle SOA Suite 11g HL7 tooling as an example. The article will also discuss and illustrate a mechanism for injecting arbitrary metadata into the canonical message, generated by the B2B Document Editor, in such a way that it is ignored by the Edge-dwelling B2B infrastructure but is significant to the SOA infrastructure.

The text of the article is available at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/HB01_OSS11g_HL7CannonicalMessageModel_v1.0.1.pdf

Oct 06

This article is of potential interest to these Sun/SeeBeyond customers who have an investment in moderate and large Java Collaboration Definition-based transformation and mapping rules, and who are looking for ways to reuse as much as possible of the Java code involved, when migrating to the Oracle SOA Suite. The example developed in this article comes from the healthcare domain and uses the HL7 OTDs (Object Type Definitions). This is a deliberate choice because all but the most trivial HL7 transformations will involve hundreds of lines of Java code, therefore are a good candidates for migrating to the SOA Suite Spring Component as means of preserving the code and the effort invested in developing it. This does not make the method domain-specific. On the contrary, the method is applicable to all other domains where JCDs with significant transformation and mapping rules content are used.

Discussion in this article addresses a subset of technologies available in the Java CAPS and in the SOA Suite. Specifically, the Java Collaboration Definitions supported in Java CAPS 5.x and in Java CAPS 6/Repository, and the Spring Component supported in the SOA Suite 11g R1 PS2. Both use the Java programming language and related runtime environment to implement processing logic.  There is no discussion pertaining to JBI-based technologies or Java CAPS BPEL-based technologies. There is no discussion about other ways in which Java logic can be deployed as part of a Oracle SOA Suite solution.

The HL7 eWay and JCD based Java CAPS solution will be ported to the Oracle SOA Suite 11g B2B and Mediator-based environment. HL7 Adapters will be replaced with the Oracle “Healthcare Adapters”, provided by the SOA Suite B2B HL7 support infrastructure. Routing will be provided by the Mediator component and transformation logic will be ported to the Spring Component.

This article walks through the process of “extracting” JCD source and related archives from Java CAPS, developing a stand-alone Java application which uses the JCD source, encapsulating JCD source in a Spring component and finally reproducing Java CAPS HL7 solution functionality in an equivalent SOA Suite solution.

The complete article is available at http://blogs.czapski.id.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/08_HL7JCD2SpringComponentMigration_v1.3.pdf

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